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Diagnosis

Diagnosis of Zika is based on a person’s recent travel history, symptoms, and test results. A blood or urine test can confirm a Zika infection. Your doctor or other healthcare provider may order blood tests to look for Zika or other similar viruses like dengue or chikungunya.

 

Sexual Transmission and Testing 

Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for about a week. See your doctor or other healthcare provider if you develop symptoms and you live in or have recently traveled to an area with Zika. Your doctor or other healthcare provider may order blood tests to look for Zika or other similar viruses like dengue or chikungunya. Once a person has been infected, he or she is likely to be protected from future infections.

CDC recommends Zika virus testing for people who may have been exposed to Zika through sex and who have Zika symptoms. A pregnant woman with possible exposure to Zika virus from sex should be tested if either she or her male partner develops symptoms of Zika.

Testing blood, semen, or urine is not recommended to determine how likely a man is to pass Zika virus through sex. This is because there is still a lot we don’t know about the virus and how to interpret test results.

Available tests may not accurately identify the presence of Zika or a man’s risk of passing it on. As we learn more and as tests improve, these tests may become more helpful for determining a man’s risk of passing Zika through sex.

 

Treatment

There is no specific medicine or vaccine for Zika virus. The CDC advises that you get plenty of rest and drink fluids to prevent dehydration. Take medicine such as acetaminophen (Tylenol®) or paracetamol to reduce fever and pain. Do not take aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) until dengue can be ruled out to reduce the risk of bleeding.

If you are taking medicine for another medical condition, talk to your healthcare provider before taking additional medication.