Nutrition
What New in the Milk Aisle?
Cow’s milk gives you a nice supply of protein and calcium for not too many calories and, if you go for 1% or fat-free, little or no saturated fat. It is recommended we get 2-3 servings of low fat or fat-free dairy a day to accommodate our body’s needs.The Recommended Dietary Allowance for adults is 1,000 milligrams a day. It jumps to 1,200 mg for women over 50 and men over 70. That includes what you get from food and from supplements. Cow’s milk provides essential vitamins like vitamin D and B-12, as well as the nutrient potassium, which helps...
Add Flavor Not Salt!
A big challenge for many dealing with high blood pressure or those trying to avoid developing problems with their blood pressure is how to make food taste good and decrease the amount of sodium used. Sodium is generally used as not only a flavoring, but also a preservative. Hence food manufacturers rely on it to extend their foods’ shelf life. Before we ever get the food to our kitchens to prep and prepare, the food has already been altered with sodium. Here are some tips to help make our food, not only healthier, but tastier: Fresh is best! Use food...
How to Add More Fruit and Vegetables to Your Diet
People often get confused when considering what is a healthy diet for them. Mixed messages from advertising and other media often don’t help. Some experts encourage avoiding meat completely as it contains saturated fat, which raises cholesterol levels and increases risk for cardiovascular disease.  Researchers also indicate that animal protein has unhealthy effects, such as releasing cancer causing toxins during high-temperature cooking (grilling for instance) and causing loss of calcium due to high amounts of amino sulfur acids. Fruits and vegetables, on the other hand, have phytochemicals which help fight off cancer. Their important fiber lowers unwanted LDL cholesterol and maintains the...
Reducing Childhood Obesity
During September we observe fruit and vegetable month and childhood obesity awareness month.  By focusing on the first awareness, we can greatly reduce obesity of all ages. Since 1980, obesity has had an increased presence in younger populations.  Physicians are now seeing children with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and joint problems, usually only found in overweight adults. Excess weight also hampers breathing as lungs are crowded by surrounding fatty tissue.  This can cause additional problems for children and adults who suffer from lung issues, such as asthma. Limited oxygen supply can also affect the amount of physical activity...
New Breastfeeding Friendly Child Care Centers
Two more daycares in Butler County have joined a growing number of Missouri daycares in becoming Gold Level Missouri Breastfeeding Friendly Worksites and also Missouri Breastfeeding Friendly Child Care Centers. Tammy Leist Daycare and The Learning Tree Daycare, both of Poplar Bluff, where recently recognized for taking steps to help breastfeeding mothers. The breastfeeding support programs are both collaborations between the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) and the Missouri Breastfeeding Coalition. Over 70 percent of Missouri mothers choose breastfeeding as the optimal form of infant feeding.  Yet, many of these women do not reach their breastfeeding goals.  The...
What to Expect From New Food Labeling
Recently, the FDA finalized changes to the nutrition facts label for the first time in 20 years. By summer of 2018, consumers will notice a difference on the labels of food products. The FDA hopes that the new label will help consumers make better-informed food choices and begin to build awareness right at the point where food purchases are made. Look for future changes in the following areas: 1. Sugars Added The new labels will include added sugars in grams and the percent daily value.  While natural sugars are perfectly healthy, the American Heart Association recommends only consuming 6 teaspoons...
Food Packaging Dates: What Do They Mean?
The date stamped on a product’s packaging, called open dating, is not the date when the food becomes unsuitable for consuming. It is there only to help the store determine how long to display the product for sale, and is not generally required by Federal regulations, with the exception of infant formula. Actually there is no uniform or universally accepted system used for food dating in the United States. Although dating of some foods is required by more than 20 states, there are areas of the country where much of the food supply has some type of open date and other areas where...
Food Allergies: React With Respect
Researchers estimate that up to 15 million Americans have food allergies. This potentially deadly disease affects 1 in every 13 children (under 18 years of age) in the U.S. That’s roughly two in every classroom. The economic cost of children’s food allergies is nearly $25 billion per year. According to a study released in 2013 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, food allergies among children increased approximately 50% between 1997 and 2011. The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why. Researchers are trying to discover why food allergies are on...
New Dietary Guidelines Encourage Small Changes
 A lifetime of healthy eating helps to prevent chronic diseases like obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes. The Dietary Guidelines provides a clear path for the general public, as well as policy makers and health professionals and others who reach the public, to help Americans make healthy choices. Obesity and other chronic diseases come not only with increased health risks, but also at a high cost. Healthy eating is one of the most powerful tools we have to reduce the onset of disease. The 2015 edition of the Dietary Guidelines focuses on three main takeaways to help Americans...
Reducing Fat in Diet Necessary for Healthy Heart
Limiting how much saturated and trans fats you eat is an important step to reduce your blood cholesterol and lower your risk of coronary artery disease. A high blood cholesterol level can lead to a buildup of plaques in your arteries, called atherosclerosis, which can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association offers these guidelines for how much fat and cholesterol to include in a heart-healthy diet: Type of fat Recommendation Saturated fat Less than 7% of your total daily calories, or less than 14 g of saturated fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet...
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