Nutrition
New Dietary Guidelines Encourage Small Changes
 A lifetime of healthy eating helps to prevent chronic diseases like obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes. The Dietary Guidelines provides a clear path for the general public, as well as policy makers and health professionals and others who reach the public, to help Americans make healthy choices. Obesity and other chronic diseases come not only with increased health risks, but also at a high cost. Healthy eating is one of the most powerful tools we have to reduce the onset of disease. The 2015 edition of the Dietary Guidelines focuses on three main takeaways to help Americans...
Reducing Fat in Diet Necessary for Healthy Heart
Limiting how much saturated and trans fats you eat is an important step to reduce your blood cholesterol and lower your risk of coronary artery disease. A high blood cholesterol level can lead to a buildup of plaques in your arteries, called atherosclerosis, which can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association offers these guidelines for how much fat and cholesterol to include in a heart-healthy diet: Type of fat Recommendation Saturated fat Less than 7% of your total daily calories, or less than 14 g of saturated fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet...
Fundamental Folic
Folic acid is a B vitamin. Folic acid helps keep your blood healthy. Not getting enough can cause anemia (uh-NEE-mee-uh). Experts think that folic acid might also play a role in heart health and preventing cell changes that may lead to cancer.  More research is needed to know this for certain. “Folic acid” and “folate” mean the same thing. Folic acid is a manmade form of folate. Folate is found naturally in some foods, but most women do not get all the folic acid they need through food alone. Women able to get pregnant need 400 to 800 mcg or micrograms...
…and a Partridge in a Pear Tree
Pears are a popular fruit over the holidays and are a good source of fiber. In fact, a medium pear contains 22% of the fiber you need in a day. This is great news for your health, since diets rich in foods containing fiber, such as some vegetables and fruits, may reduce the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.  Plus, research indicates that fiber is key to healthy digestion, reducing constipation and diverticulosis. A medium pear also has 12% of the daily value for vitamin C and 10% of the daily value of vitamin K. Vitamin C...
Tips for Making a Healthier Sweetened Beverage
According to the CDC, Center for Disease Control , a large proportion of added sugar in the American diet comes from the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Among adults, consumption of carbonated soft drinks (regular and low calorie) and fruit drinks/ades (not 100% juice) increased by at least 100% between 1977–1978 and 1994–1995. In 1996, Americans aged 2 years and older consumed 83 more calories of added sugar per day than they did in 1977. Of these additional calories, 54 came from carbonated soft drinks (regular and low calorie) and 13 came from sugared fruit drinks. Consumption of sugar sweetened beverages has...
Sprouted Grains: The New Power Food
Courtesy: Beth Rosen, MS, RD, CDN, Food and Health Communications Why are we seeing more products on our supermarket shelf labeled “made with sprouted grains”? Historically, many of our grains sprouted accidentally, a circumstance that modern techniques largely eliminated. Now, however, we’re learning that we may be missing out by turning our back on sprouting; new techniques of controlled sprouting give us the best of the past, for better health. Sprouted grains are in limbo between being a grain seed and developing into a new plant. In order to trigger a seed to grow, its enzymes are activated in warm and...
What You Should Know Before Eating Out
The food vendors in your community( restaurants, delis, grocery stores, and others), must follow local food safety rules. These rules are set by your city, county, district, or state. Each community may have the same or slightly different food safety rules and requirements for food vendors. All food safety rules have similar requirements about Food or food ingredients coming from a safe source. Food being held at the correct cold or hot temperatures. Food being cooked properly, especially foods such as meat, poultry, and pork. Food being handled to prevent cross-contamination from the environment (for example, common work areas or...
Freezing Your Favorite Fruits or Veggies
Is your garden putting out more produce than you can handle or give away? Try these helpful suggestions and give freezing your favorites a try. 1. Only freeze quality fruits or vegetables. Freezing produce that has molded, not ripened yet, or rotted will not change or fix what was wrong with it. 2. Only freeze fruits and vegetables that you plan to eat frozen or cook. 3. Before you freeze anything , make vegetables ready to use by peeling and chopping them first. Grated vegetables do not have to be cooked before freezing. This makes them easy to use for...
Food Safety Tips for Preschoolers
Keeping your preschooler safe is your number one priority. Building safe habits will be valuable throughout their lives. Follow these simple tips to keep food safe and clean for your preschooler. 1. Develop a healthy habit for life. Encourage handwashing after using the bathroom, before and after eating, after playing with pets, or whenever they are dirty. Preschoolers are less likely to get sick if they wash their hands often. Keep a stool by the sink to make handwashing easier. 2. Make handwashing fun! Sing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” or the “Alphabet” song or count for 20 seconds each time to...
10 Top Tips for Men’s Health
1. Magic foods do not exist. There’s no magic food or way to eat. There are some foods men need to eat such as vegetables; fruits; whole grains; protein foods like beans, eggs, or lean meats; and dairy like 1% milk. You’ll get nutrients you need for good health―including magnesium, potassium, calcium, vitamin D, fiber, and protein. 2. If it’s there, you’ll eat it. Keep healthy foods in your kitchen that need little preparation. Keep your fridge filled with carrots, apples, oranges, low-fat yogurt, and eggs. Stock up on fresh, canned, or frozen vegetables and fruits, lean meats, canned beans, and tuna...
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