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Possible Measles Exposures
  March 21, 2018 Possible measles exposures in the St. Louis area JEFFERSON CITY, MO – The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is working with the St. Louis County Department of Public Health to notify individuals who may have been exposed to measles on March 13 or March 14, 2018. Known locations where exposures may have occurred on March 13 are The Magic House in Kirkwood, Missouri, Racanelli’s New York Pizzeria in Kirkwood, Missouri, and Homewood Suites in Chesterfield, Missouri. The only known location where exposure may have occurred on March 14 is Homewood Suites in Chesterfield,...
Friday’s Hepatitis A Update
Butler County’s Hepatitis A cases have consistently increased over the past week. As of March 15, 2018, 58 confirmed cases have been identified; 58% of cases reported hospitalization, with cases ranging from 19-64 years of age. The majority of cases have been in people who use drugs and/or their close personal contacts. If you know someone who uses drugs or is a close personal contact of someone who uses drugs, please let them know he or she can get vaccinated at BCHD. Just tell the receptionists #Franksentme!  ...
Hepatitis A Outbreak Update
Hepatitis A case identified in Poplar Bluff, MO JEFFERSON CITY, MO – A case of hepatitis A has been identified in a food handler that worked while potentially contagious at Huddle House in Poplar Bluff, Missouri. The restaurant, in conjunction with the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services and Butler County Health Department, is investigating and is taking necessary control measures to decrease the spread of the illness. Members of the public who ate at the Poplar Bluff, Missouri Huddle House between January 3, 2018 and January 17, 2018 should consider speaking with their health care provider about steps...
National Public Health Week April 4th-10th
Join us in celebrating National Public Health Week 2016 and become a part of the movement for change: BUILD A NATION OF SAFE, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Health must be a priority in designing our communities, from healthy housing to parks and playgrounds. Walking and biking must coexist with cars and public transportation. We need lower levels of violence and crime so everyone can safely live, work, learn and play. Support farmers markets and local businesses that value health, such as retailers that don’t sell tobacco. HELP ALL YOUNG PEOPLE GRADUATE FROM HIGH SCHOOL Education is the leading indicator of good health,...
Jump Into Water Fitness!
Regular exercise is vital for good health. Finding something you like is important or you won’t continue with it. If you’re struggling with finding a program that works for you, needing to mix it up a little, or looking for a change, why not try water fitness. Water fitness (or water aerobics) programs and classes can help develop flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and even deliver cardio-respiratory benefits. Other physical benefits include increased range of motion, improved balance and coordination, and a chance for some great relaxation. Exercising in water is different than land exercise. These differences create a great environment...
The Continuing Problem in Preventing Birth Defects
Birth defects are structural changes present at birth that can affect almost any part or parts of the body (e.g., heart, brain, foot). Every 4 ½ minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect in the United States. That means nearly 120,000 babies (1 in every 33) are affected by birth defects each year.Birth defects can vary from mild to severe. They may affect how the body looks, works, or both. The well-being of each child affected with a birth defect depends mostly on which organ or body part is involved and how much it is affected. Depending on...
The Importance of Handwashing
As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands.  Germs on your hands can get into the body through the eyes, nose, and mouth and make us sick. Although it’s impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes. Most infections (98%), whether viral or bacterial, are spread by our hands.  It is estimated that there are 1500 germs in one square centimeter alone. Most are harmless, but you can pick up some that cause illnesses, such as colds, flu, and diarrhea. Proper...
Fall Is the Time for Flu Shots
The timing of flu is very unpredictable and can vary in different parts of the country and from season to season. Most seasonal flu activity typically occurs between October and May. Flu activity most commonly peaks in the United States between December and February. A yearly flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months and older as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. While everyone should get a flu vaccine each flu season, it’s especially important that certain people get vaccinated either because they are at high risk of having serious flu-related complications or because...
Advances in Lung Cancer Detection and Treatment
 The diagnosis and treatment of non small cell lung cancer has changed dramatically in the past 50 years since the Surgeon General’s report on smoking and lung cancer. Early detection is now a reality for lung cancer. Early detection A large clinical trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) found that spiral CT scans in people at high risk of lung cancer (due to smoking history) lower the risk of death from lung cancer, when compared to chest x-rays. This finding has led to the development of screening guidelines for lung cancer. Another approach now being studied uses newer,...
The Importance of Mammograms
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 1 in 8 (12%) women in the US will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Breast cancer is also the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Annual mammograms can detect cancer early — when it is most treatable. Current guidelines from the American College of Radiology, the American Cancer Society, and the Society for Breast Imaging recommend that women receive annual mammograms starting at age 40 — even if they have no symptoms or family history of breast...
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